A new 'old' Slippery 38

Aotea

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2018
Posts
185
Likes
166
Location
Atlanta
AOTEA SLIPPERY 38.jpg

Some people carve model boats when they have time on their hands. I don’t know how to do that. So I designed my own Slippery 38 in Adobe Illustrator, using Spencer Lincoln’s sketch of the original open-sided lobster boat which he prepared for Young Brothers themselves in 1978. That drawing helped me trace the curves of the hull. The drawings (a profile and deck plan) were posted here by Stumpstalker last August. My boat retains that same ‘square’ Young Brothers look to the house, but the house roof is raised slightly above the window line and I’ve added some retro features like round portlights and pipe grabrails (in stainless on Perko stanchions) that remind me of old boats in New Zealand. I would also add some tumblehome on the house to prevent that ‘sides-are-falling-apart’ look when viewed from the front. Interestingly, I learned a lot from studying Spencer Lincoln’s drawing of Earnest Libby’s original. The bow is a perfect curve, and there are actually two curves on the sheer. Also, most Young Brothers-built Slippery 38s carried that raised side bead forward horizontally, right along the side of the cabin top, dead straight, but Spencer Lincoln gave the cabin top a slight rise. He also pitched the waterline down just a degree towards the bow, giving a drawing (and the boat) a more ‘forward’ look. The eyes don’t see it, but the brain does. Stewart Workman told me that it doesn’t take a lot of power to push a Slippery 38 through the water, they go so well (but he didn’t say exactly how much!). I developed the burgee from the DBF logo. So that's done. Now what do I do?
 

Eastporter

Captain
Joined
Sep 1, 2011
Posts
3,443
Likes
1,072
Location
MA
Boat Make
Sold- 20' Eastporter (Rebuilt 2011) 22' Pearson Ensign
Can you please post more of the 3-D photos you created? Very talented on the computer designs! Thanks for sharing.
 

Aotea

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2018
Posts
185
Likes
166
Location
Atlanta
Can you please post more of the 3-D photos you created? Very talented on the computer designs! Thanks for sharing.
I would love to, Eastporter. Thank you. But this was a shakedown cruise. Always wondered how the folks at Grand Banks and Offshore Yachts produced such beautiful images of their boats. This was an exercise in trying to figure out how they did it. And I learned a lot of things, but they are way ahead of the curve.
 

Samp

Member
Joined
Feb 16, 2015
Posts
96
Likes
62
She’s a beaut. How about fiddling around with a smaller, say, 30’ design?
 

MikesMarine22

Senior Member
Joined
Oct 21, 2011
Posts
496
Likes
275
Location
Mass
Boat Make
Holland 14, YB 33
Does SW have the mold for this? I wonder the last time it was used if so...
 

Aotea

Senior Member
Joined
Aug 19, 2018
Posts
185
Likes
166
Location
Atlanta
Does SW have the mold for this? I wonder the last time it was used if so...
Yes, they do. Stewart Workman says it's viable but fairing the hull would add significant cost. Apparently, the mold was taken years ago from an old wood boat that had some planking showing. In pictures of Slippery 38s -- including a project boat posted here, I think last year -- you can see the faint impression of planks on the glass hull. Interestingly, I wouldn't mind that, it's a historic mold. The Young Bros. website quotes $30,500 for a solid glass hull with a lobster top for $14,500. The 'newest' build they show on the website is 1981. Raven, posted here last year, was built in 1977. The former Miss Rita (recently for sale in New York) was also 1977.
 
Last edited:

magicdoll

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2018
Posts
55
Likes
36
Age
64
View attachment 80751

Some people carve model boats when they have time on their hands. I don’t know how to do that. So I designed my own Slippery 38 in Adobe Illustrator, using Spencer Lincoln’s sketch of the original open-sided lobster boat which he prepared for Young Brothers themselves in 1978. That drawing helped me trace the curves of the hull. The drawings (a profile and deck plan) were posted here by Stumpstalker last August. My boat retains that same ‘square’ Young Brothers look to the house, but the house roof is raised slightly above the window line and I’ve added some retro features like round portlights and pipe grabrails (in stainless on Perko stanchions) that remind me of old boats in New Zealand. I would also add some tumblehome on the house to prevent that ‘sides-are-falling-apart’ look when viewed from the front. Interestingly, I learned a lot from studying Spencer Lincoln’s drawing of Earnest Libby’s original. The bow is a perfect curve, and there are actually two curves on the sheer. Also, most Young Brothers-built Slippery 38s carried that raised side bead forward horizontally, right along the side of the cabin top, dead straight, but Spencer Lincoln gave the cabin top a slight rise. He also pitched the waterline down just a degree towards the bow, giving a drawing (and the boat) a more ‘forward’ look. The eyes don’t see it, but the brain does. Stewart Workman told me that it doesn’t take a lot of power to push a Slippery 38 through the water, they go so well (but he didn’t say exactly how much!). I developed the burgee from the DBF logo. So that's done. Now what do I do?
 

magicdoll

Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2018
Posts
55
Likes
36
Age
64

one of the most beautiful hulls ever made ! I too have talked to Steve Workman about building one but I got sidetracked with other projects along the way. My doll and I even traveled to the Thimble Islands, CT to look at Raven, an original wooden Slippery 38 done in glossy black and traditional trim colors . It was December and she was up on the rails and I got good look at the bottom--perfect, in fact the next season I watcher her run near Faulkner's Island at about 16 knots and I can only describe her as a "swimming hull". After that bottom inspection in December of 2010 doll and I went to Essex for the Christmas Tree lighting and a few Crown Royals. As always a magical experience with my doll.
 

Snake8

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 1, 2016
Posts
122
Likes
73
Those are lovely boats, really IMO one of the prettiest and efficient hulls. There was one for sale out of saugus/revere, ma or somewhere around there recently for fairly short money. It was a working lobsterboat, needed some love. Athern had another one up for a while.
 
Top Bottom