Refit of Cape Dory 28 ft Open Fisherman

Discussion in 'Downeast Boat General Discussion' started by Shipbuilder, Jun 23, 2019.

  1. Shipbuilder

    Shipbuilder New Member

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    We are planning a refit of our CD28 open fisherman this Fall
    This is a 1987 hull with the original 350 Merc Cruiser
    Plan is to install a diesel, remove stove, reconfigure galley, replace cabin sole, tanks, remove hot water tank, repaint hull and topside, replace canvass
    Has anyone changed out one of these gas to diesel, HP selected? Pitfalls?
    Recognize running gear must also be changed.
    Have had this boat 15 years and love it. We use it as a day boat/picnic boat, not cruising.
    Looking for experience with CD or something similar.
    Thanks,
    Jim
     
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  2. WoundUpMarine

    WoundUpMarine Captain

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    Budget Budget Budget. How much are you looking to spend? What speeds do you get out of her now, and what are your goals? New diesel? Reman? RTO? So many questions just to start a conversation.
     
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  3. PatriciaLynn

    PatriciaLynn Senior Member

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    Probably makes more sense to sell this one and find one with a diesel or just repower with gas. I know that everyone on here loves diesels, but gas engines make way more sense for recreational <500 hours per year use. You can get a whole new gas engine and reuse your mounts and trans for around $15k installed. Unless fuel range is a MAJOR issue, just stick with gas. Modern fuel injected gas engines are quieter, smoother, lighter, don't stink and are cheaper.

    Plan on around $35-40k for a diesel repower if you can hold back on the reins and not go overboard on projects...
     
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  4. djmarchand

    djmarchand Captain

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    Some CD 28s were repowered in the past with 220 hp Yanmar 4LH engines which is a great choice. But these are no longer made so you would have to look for a used/rebuilt one. Maybe a Volvo D4 would work.

    I agree with PatriciaLynn above. Gas is much cheaper to install and you won't ever recover the extra cost of a diesel repower with fuel savings. Also the gasser is quieter.

    David
     
  5. Skeetsdad

    Skeetsdad Senior Member

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    I looked at repowering my 1987 CD28 Flybridge. It had a Volvo TAMD41A. I got a price on the new Yanmar 4LV of $38K for the motor without the gear. I found a Yanmar 4LH but passed on it when I got an estemate from Neimic of appx $20K to pull the Volvo and install the Yanmar. As the others have mentioned, you may want to stay with gas and go for a newer fuel injected engine. If youre going to repaint, Im guessing youre going to want to address the gelcoat issues that Cape Dory's are famous for.. that in addition to the paint job will be a bit pricey. I agree with reconfiguring the galley and getting rid of that alcohol stove. We used a portable propane burner which worked a lot better. Good luck, if you decide to move forward post some pics of your project.
     
  6. WoundUpMarine

    WoundUpMarine Captain

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    So I re-powered my Libby, enjoyed the process, and stayed fairly cheap in my budget because my running gear was all built for the big increase in power. I can see how the project can become challenging and expensive very quickly, as an example check out the BHM thread going on, he is working through some tough issues. I'll be re powering my Duffy this winter, or next, mostly because I want to go faster and I enjoy the project. I have no idea what your mechanical abilities are, but I have no fear what so ever of buying a used diesel and going with it. I'm still 50/50 about using a gas engine, and will just make the decision when a good deal on any engine presents itself. So anyway, I guess what I'm rambling on about is don't be afraid of the project, but make sure you go into it with open eyes.
     
  7. Shipbuilder

    Shipbuilder New Member

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    A little more info:
    I agree with all who said stick with gas, I am 76 years old, aging out, and giving the boat to my son who is an attorney who has read too many legal horror stories about gas. Further, I have built about 70 glass boats, mostly sail, so I kind of know what I'm getting in to with the cosmetics. I AM NOT an Engine expert.
    The boat currently cruises at 13 KTs, about the max we run her is 18 with a fair current, I would like to keep that performance, my son would like to go a bit faster, I'm not sure the hull shape on this boat will allow much more efficient speed.
    Our budget is $60K. The idea is to get 20 more years out of the boat, I have gone over the hull in detail this past winter, fixed the blisters and barrier coated the bottom. The hull is solid, the cored deck has the usual gel coat issues. Thinking perhaps about a rebuilt diesel.
    We have thought about selling her, but I think the CD hulls of this era are pretty bullet proof, I am not a fan of cored hulls.
     
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  8. Quik Fix 16

    Quik Fix 16 Senior Member

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    I recently finished a complete redo of a 31 Grand Slam Shamrock. Boynton built and absolutely the most solid, best thought out boat I have ever done. Had a couple of 454 RTO from a Carolina Classic. Rebuilt, installed and,I think it was the right move. If I had a couple of 6BTs I would have been happier but I went with what I had. I get almost 1 mpg cruising at 22-23 mph. Have 66 hours on the boat and I will be selling it soon. All the bugs are gone and on to the next. Point being, go with what you have. If you have a big bank account, go new diesel. If you are like me, use what you have. JMO. 313.jpg
     
  9. PatriciaLynn

    PatriciaLynn Senior Member

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    If you have $60k to spend on it, by all means, GO FOR IT! A 210 or 250ish 6BT or 6BTA factory reman will last you 20 yrs in that boat. Engine and transmission will run you $25k. Size the transmission gearing to keep the same shaft size and similar propellor and you will be right as rain. I would expect a yard to charge around $12-15k to install the new engine and trans if you can keep the same shaft, bearings, etc.
     
  10. djmarchand

    djmarchand Captain

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    Shipbuilder:

    I owned a CD 28 with the 275 hp Chrysler gasser. Here is some data I collected- some extrapolated from wot performance, some inferred from fuel burn at intermediate power levels:

    20 kts 275 hp
    16 kts 155 hp
    12 kts 125 hp

    This indicates to me that 16 kts and 155 hp is the sweet spot, maybe a little less. The boat is not on a clean plane at 12 kts (still pulling over the hump) but seems to be on a clean plane at 16 and the hp required is only 30 more than 12 kts.

    The discontinued 3.8 liter Yanmar 4LH or the 3.7 liter modern Volvo D4 could do this and keep the power level down to 40 hp per liter, the maximum that some pros would recommend for continuous cruising. The 2.8 liter Yanmar 4LV could not without significantly exceeding 40 hp per liter. The Steyr 6 cylinder could do it but at 3.1 liters it would be over 40 hp per liter and is probably not well supported in your area. I don't think the Cummins 6BTA will fit- it is too tall. Those are all of the possibilities I can think of.

    Good luck on your project.

    David
     
    Last edited: Jun 24, 2019
  11. Skeetsdad

    Skeetsdad Senior Member

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    If you have $60K to put into the boat and your happy with it, then it sounds like you may have a good plan. There is a lot of info on the capedory28 website about the hull and the speed capabilities with various power packages. Some comments about "keel walk" at higher speeds.

    There was a guy on the cape that put a 6BT in his CD28. He said he had to do some mods to the underside of the hatch but was able to keep the flush deck. That boat was listed by Annie Gray a few years ago but I dont think it sold.

    The feedback I have heard on the Volvo D4-260s was they are good engines but because they are electronic, you need to have them serviced by a volvo mechanic w/ the volvo diagnostics software. If you dont have good Volvo service near you it could be challenging. Same applies to most engines I guess.
     
  12. scout 30

    scout 30 Member

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    If it was me I'd seriously consider an Armstrong bracket & a 2 new Hondas or Yamahas. Getting the motors out of the boat not only reduces the risk of fire but also reduces the noise & vibration. Plus these new motors are very efficient. A diesel will not just be way more expensive but much louder.
     

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